Getting Skin Deep

Your skin type is determined by genetics. The condition of your skin can vary greatly according to the various internal and external factors it is subjected to. If you need further advice on how best to care for it, Skinitiative® recommends that you contact a dermatologist or pharmacist.

Getting Skin Deep

Your skin type is determined by genetics. The condition of your skin can vary greatly according to the various internal and external factors it is subjected to. If you need further advice on how best to care for it, Skinitiative® recommends that you contact a dermatologist or pharmacist.

1. Normal Skin

‘Normal’ is a term widely used to refer to well-balanced skin. The T-zone (forehead, chin and nose) may be a bit oily, but the overall sebum and moisture is balanced and the skin is neither too oily nor too dry.

Normal skin has

  • fine pores
  • good blood circulation
  • a velvety, soft and smooth texture
  • a fresh, rosy colour & uniform transparency
  • no blemishes, and
  • is not prone to sensitivity.

As a person with normal skin ages, their skin can become dryer due to Vitamin E depletion in skin cells.

2. Dry Skin

‘Dry’ is used to describe skin with less sebum than normal skin. As a result of the lack of sebum, dry skin lacks the lipids needed to retain moisture and build a protective shield against external influences. Significantly more women suffer from dry skin than men and all skin gets dryer as it ages.

The causes of dry skin

Your skin’s moisture depends on the supply of water in the deeper skin layers and on perspiration.

Skin is constantly loosing water via:

  • Perspiration: active water loss from the glands caused by heat, stress and activity.
  • Trans-epidermal water loss: Your skin diffuses about half a litre of water a day from the deeper skin layers.

Dry skin is caused by a lack of:

  • Natural moisturising factors (NMFs) – especially urea, amino acids and lactic acid – that help to bind in water.
  • Epidermal lipids such as ceramides, fatty acids and cholesterol which are needed for a healthy skin barrier function.

As a result, your skin’s barrier function can become compromised.

2. Dry Skin

‘Dry’ is used to describe skin with less sebum than normal skin. As a result of the lack of sebum, dry skin lacks the lipids needed to retain moisture and build a protective shield against external influences. Significantly more women suffer from dry skin than men and all skin gets dryer as it ages.

The causes of dry skin

Your skin’s moisture depends on the supply of water in the deeper skin layers and on perspiration.

Skin is constantly loosing water via:

  • Perspiration: active water loss from the glands caused by heat, stress and activity.
  • Trans-epidermal water loss: Your skin diffuses about half a litre of water a day from the deeper skin layers.

Dry skin is caused by a lack of:

  • Natural moisturising factors (NMFs) – especially urea, amino acids and lactic acid – that help to bind in water.
  • Epidermal lipids such as ceramides, fatty acids and cholesterol which are needed for a healthy skin barrier function.

As a result, your skin’s barrier function can become compromised.

3. Oily Skin

‘Oily’ is used to describe a skin type with heightened sebum production. This overproduction is known as seborrhoea.

The causes of oily skin

A number of issues can trigger the overproduction of sebum:

  • genetics
  • hormonal changes and imbalances
  • medication
  • stress
  • comedogenic cosmetics (make-up products that cause irritation)

How to identify the different types of oily skin?

Oily skin is characterised by:

  • enlarged, clearly visible pores 
  • a glossy shine
  • thicker, pale skin: blood vessels may not be visible

Oily skin is prone to blackheads and whiteheads and to varying forms of acne.

With mild acne, a significant number of comedones appear on the face and frequently on the neck, shoulders, back and chest too.

In moderate and severe cases, papules (small bumps with no visible white or black head) and pustules (medium sized bumps with a noticeable white or yellow dot at the centre) appear and the skin becomes red and inflamed.

4. Combination Skin

In combination skin, the skin types vary in the T-zone and the cheeks. The T-zone can differ substantially – from a very slim zone to an extended area.

Combination skin is characterised by:

  • an oily T-zone (forehead, chin and nose) 
  • enlarged pores in this area, perhaps with some impurities
  • normal to dry cheeks

The causes of combination skin

The oilier parts of combination skin are caused by an overproduction of sebum. The drier parts of combination skin are caused by a lack of sebum and a corresponding lipid deficiency.

4. Combination Skin

In combination skin, the skin types vary in the T-zone and the cheeks. The T-zone can differ substantially – from a very slim zone to an extended area.

Combination skin is characterised by:

  • an oily T-zone (forehead, chin and nose) 
  • enlarged pores in this area, perhaps with some impurities
  • normal to dry cheeks

The causes of combination skin

The oilier parts of combination skin are caused by an overproduction of sebum. The drier parts of combination skin are caused by a lack of sebum and a corresponding lipid deficiency.

Scroll to Top